Next Performance

October 23, 2016, at 3:00 pm

Massapequa Philharmonic

Dvořák | Slavonic Dance Op. 46, No. 1
Dvořák | Symphony No. 8, Op. 88
Dvořák | Cello Concerto, Op. 104

Adrian Daurov, Cello

See All Performances

Featured Recording

Stravinsky The Rite of Spring / Bartók Concerto for Orchestra / David Bernard / Park Avenue Chamber Symphony

May 16, 2016

Stravinsky | The Rite of Spring
Bartók | Concerto for Orchestra

See All Recordings

Latest News

160916-gramophone-review-icon

GRAMOPHONE CD REVIEW: Stravinsky/Bartók: Park Avenue Chamber Symphony conducted by David Bernard

“Committed and forceful traversals of these formidable scores…Bernard is sensitive to both the eerie and the jubilant aspects that make [Bartók’s Concerto for Orchestra] such a singular experience.”  –Donald Rosenberg

See All News

David Bernard
David BernardSeptember 29th, 2016 at 12:57am
THE POWER OF A SINGLE NOTE: DVOŘÁK'S CELLO CONCERTO, 3RD MOVEMENT
Dvořák’s homesickness and unrequited love for his dying sister-in-law served as a powerful catalyst for the composition of perhaps his most personal orchestral work---his Cello Concerto. A profoundly personal statement of struggle and loss, the solo cello is often less an expression of virtuosity, than it is a narrator that escorts the listener through a spectacular journey imbued with sublime beauty and brilliance. While we experience many memorable moments along the way, the most powerful occurs towards the end of the work. After wistful phrases explore the depths of his pain and longing, Dvořák achieves transfiguration with an ethereal, hymn-like coda. But as the soloist and orchestra unwind towards the work's ending, the soloist plays a D-natural instead of the recurring D-sharps that preceded it. This single note, marked pianissimo, has the power of a bolt of lightning-- a shocking flashback to Dvořák’s painful struggles that drove him to leave New York City and return to Czechoslovakia. With one note, Dvořák reveals his soul. It is a profound moment that you must experience at least once! The Third Movement is only 13 minutes long, so give it a listen---but be sure to listen all the way through to catch this incredible moment.

Of course the best way to experience this work is to hear it live in its entirety. I'll be performing Dvořák's Cello Concerto with the renowned cellist Adrian Daurov with the Massapequa Philharmonic Orchestra in an all-Dvořák program that also includes his Slavonic Dance, Op. 46 No. 1 and Symphony No. 8 on Sunday, October 23rd at 3PM at Berner Auditorium, 50 Carman Mill Road, Massapequa. For more information, please visit http://www.massphil.com/concerts/2016/10/23/autumn-in-prague
181 9 29    View on Facebook